U.S. Holocaust Museum

U.S. Holocaust Museum

The United States Holocaust Museum is a somber memorial to the lives changed and lost as a result of the Nazi extermination of Jews in the mid-20th century. Through pictures, videos and artifacts, the museum reminds us of the tragedy that was the Holocaust while urging us to never let anything like it happen again.

U.S. Holocaust Museum

U.S. Holocaust Museum
Most of the museum is designed to look like a Nazi Concentration Camp where millions of Jews were killed in Europe. This is the beginning of the tour, an elevator to the 4th floor.
U.S. Holocaust Museum
The crowd at the museum was surprising large for a Friday morning
U.S. Holocaust Museum
A “Gypsy” wagon from one of the areas in Europe where the Nazis relocated a whole people group for their convenience and ideology.
U.S. Holocaust Museum
Torah fragments from European Synagogues that the Nazis desecrated
U.S. Holocaust Museum
The “ark” from the Synagogue in Nentershausen, German. The inscription that the Nazis desecrated on the “Night of Broken Glass” reads “Know Before Whom You Stand.”
U.S. Holocaust Museum
This tree stump served as a grave marker where the Nazis executed over 1700 Jews near the town of Palmiry in Poland.
U.S. Holocaust Museum
A bed from the Sachsenberg clinic where children were killed by starvation, lethal injections, or overdoses of medicine mixed in with their food.
U.S. Holocaust Museum
An uncut section of material from Belgium from which the Star of David would be cut for Jews to wear to identify themselves as Jews.
U.S. Holocaust Museum
A section about Anne Frank, a well-known Dutch Jew who, with her family, hid for a time from the Nazis before finally being caught and sent to a concentration camp
U.S. Holocaust Museum
A milk can where some Jews hid and buried the Oneg Shabbat Archive in Warsaw
U.S. Holocaust Museum
Work implements found after the war on the site of the former ghetto in Lodz, Poland
U.S. Holocaust Museum
The main door from the Wolff Hospital in Lodz, Poland
U.S. Holocaust Museum
The gate of the Jewish cemetery in Tarnow, Poland, where the Nazis killed between 5,000 and 10,000 Jews in a few days in June in 1942.
Arbeit macht frei
“Work Sets You Free,” a German phrase known to have appeared at concentration camps including Auschwitz
U.S. Holocaust Museum
Restored bunks from Auschwitz-Birkenau concentration camp is an example of the degrading conditions Jews had to endure.
U.S. Holocaust Museum
“We are the shoes, we are the last witnesses. We are shes from grandchildren and grandfathers from Prague, Paris, and Amsterdam, and because we are only made of fabric and leather and not of blood and flesh, each one of us avoided the hellfire.” -Yiddish Poet, Moses Schulstein (1911-1981)
U.S. Holocaust Museum
A special table used to remove gold from corpses
U.S. Holocaust Museum
An example of the crematoria used to dispose of the bodies of Jews killed by the Nazis in the concentration camps
U.S. Holocaust Museum
A Danish rescue boat used to rescue Jews from Germany to the Swedish coast
U.S. Holocaust Museum
The concentration camp uniform cap and blanket wore by Berl Miklin following his escape from the SS, remaining in hiding until Soviet troops liberated the area near Stutthof
U.S. Holocaust Museum
Hundreds of photos from one town in Europe of a Jewish community that was nearly wiped out serves as a reminder of the human toll of the Holocaust

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