Ford’s Theatre

The infamous Ford’s Theatre on 10th Street in Washington D.C. is, as most American’s know, where Abraham Lincoln was shot by John Wilkes Booth. Since that fateful day, the theater building has gone through several owners and uses until its present use as an American historic site and active theater. Part of the Ford’s Theatre “complex” is a museum below the theater and the Petersen house across the street, where the dying Lincoln and taken to spend his last moments on earth before become a part of American history.

Ford's Theatre
Ford’s Theatre, home of several live performances in the 1860s before it was the site of Abraham Lincoln’s assassination in 1865.
Ford's Theatre Lincoln's box
The infamous box where Lincoln was assassinated (they’re careful not to call it a “booth”!)
Ford's Theatre
The stage where live shows are still performed
Ford's Theatre
Lincoln, of course, wouldn’t have seen the electric lights, but are present for the ongoing performances at Ford’s Theatre
Ford's Theatre
Visitors to Ford’s Theatre attend a narrative by one of the Park Rangers
John Wilkes Booth's gun
The gun John Wilkes Booth used to kill Lincoln
Ford's Theatre museum
Description with Booth’s pistol
Lincoln's pillow
Pillow Lincoln was laying on when he died
Ford's Theatre
Pieces of the wall paper that were in the box Lincoln was shot in
Ford's Theatre
“Lincoln Borne by Loving Hands” by Carl Bersch, 1865, on display in the museum at Ford’s Theatre
Ford's Theatre
The Petersen House, across the street from Ford’s Theatre where Lincoln was taken after being shot
Petersen House
The Petersen House, across the street from Ford’s Theatre where Lincoln was taken after being shot
Petersen House
The Petersen House, across the street from Ford’s Theatre where Lincoln was taken after being shot
Petersen House
The Petersen House, across the street from Ford’s Theatre where Lincoln was taken after being shot
Petersen House
The room at the Petersen House where Lincoln was taken, and died.
Petersen House
A replica of the bed where Lincoln died. The original is on display at the Chicago American History Museum

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